RACE INFO

THE PLAN FOR 2022

We're running TIOC as a one-day event this year – on Saturday, Sept 24 – with small boats/SUPs and OC6 Mixed in the early morning, and OC6 Women & Men in the late morning. You can choose to participate in one or both races.

RACE SITE @ TS&CC

TIOC-Race Site.png

OC6

OC6 RENTALS

Teams can request to rent an OC6 boat for the race, and we’ll make our best attempt to supply your crew with one. However, boats are owned by various clubs, and there is no guarantee that we will have any available. The first step is to register for the race and request a boat on the form. We’ll look at our inventory of available OC6s and, if a boat is available, we will connect you with the boat owner/club representative and you’ll take it from there, renting directly from the owner. As described in the Rental Agreement, any damage to the boat will be your crew’s responsibility to repair/replace.

 

UNLIMITED CANOES

The modern ultralight (<200 lbs) OC6s available today are faster than spec (350+ lbs) boats - that’s a fact. So they can’t race unadjusted in a head-to-head race with specs. That gives us two choices: we run them as  a separate class – which we can do if there are enough of them in a race – or we specify a standard time adjustment. Based on race results research from races around the world, we’ve determined that the time adjustment we’ll make is 1.12X. It’s not a perfect system as every boat is different, but it’s what we think is the best way to standardize times, and allow ultralights into the same class as specs.
 

PADDLING EXPERIENCE

Under strong weather conditions, Lake Ontario can be an extremely challenging paddling environment – even for experienced experts. It’s very important that paddlers have a realistic sense of their own capabilities, and only race when they’re able to do so safely.

 

On the registration form you will self-declare your own experience level. Please be honest and realistic. If you’re saying you’re Advanced, imagine being on the back side of the Toronto Islands in 30 knot winds, with 6 foot waves – exhausted after having already paddled 10 km in these tough conditions. Are you confident that you’ll be able  to right the boat, get back on, and keep paddling another 7-8 kms? If you’re in an OC6, are you fully confident that you and your crew will be able to get the OC6 flipped upright and bailed, and get everyone safely back into the boat in those conditions? Self-confidence is a great trait, but overconfidence will make for a very bad day on the water. Be realistic and honest.

 

BEGINNER

  • A newer paddler with 1-2 years of paddling experience in the craft you’ll be racing in.

  • Have self-rescued (eg huli recovery) in at least flat conditions.

  • Have recently paddled at least the range you’ll be racing on many occasions.

  • At least basic physical fitness and paddling strength.

INTERMEDIATE

  • 3-5 years of paddling experience in the craft you’ll be racing in.

  • Have self-rescued (eg huli recovery) in at least 2-3 foot waves in the craft you’ll be racing in.

  • Have recently paddled at least the range you’ll be racing on many occasions.

  • At least intermediate physical fitness and paddling strength.

ADVANCED

  • 5+ years of paddling experience in the craft you’ll be racing in.

  • Have self-rescued (eg huli recovery) in at least 4-5 foot waves in the craft you’ll be racing in.

  • Have recently paddled at least the range you’ll be racing on many occasions.

  • Strong physical fitness and paddling strength.

SAFETY

Self-Rescue
Just like when you’re paddling on your own, when you get into trouble it’s up to you to get yourself out of it. This is another reason why it’s critical to assess your capabilities and align them to the forecasted conditions BEFORE the race – and take yourself out of it if they don’t align.


Race committee boats are not rescue boats - they play a supporting role in race management, and may have very little or no ability at all to offer any type of support in a rescue situation. 


Having said that, if you’re a racer on the course and see someone in trouble – please help them. Safety is far more important than race results. If everyone is able to keep going – and your race time was impacted – let the organizers know afterwards and we’ll adjust your time.


Race day shouldn’t be the first time you huli-recover in the conditions you’re racing in – in the craft you’re racing in – and that’s especially true for OC6. Many OC6 crews do not practice hulis, then show up on race day and struggle to recover when they huli. Don’t make that you. Practice hulis in advance of TIOC.


Weather / Condition Classification
On race morning the committee will post a weather forecast, including a Condition Classification:
  LIGHT - Less than 1’ swell and/or up to 5 kt winds - All paddlers ok.
  MEDIUM - 2-4’ swell and/or 6-19 kt winds - Intermediate / Advanced paddlers only for 17k Race Course. Depending on conditions, we may or may not provide an alternate short course.
  HEAVY - 5’+ swell and/or 20+ kt winds - Advanced paddlers only for 17k Race Course. Depending on conditions, we may or may not provide an alternate short course.


Mandatory Equipment - OC1 / OC2 / Surfski / Kayak / SUP

  • Leash

  • PFD

  • Cell phone (waterproofed)

  • Whistle

 

Mandatory Equipment - OC6

  • Six PFDs

  • Cell phone (waterproofed)

  • Whistle

  • Bailers - must be tied in

Checking Out of the Race
Once you’ve crossed the finish line your race isn’t over yet – you need to checkout with the Chief Finish Judge - wearing a bright yellow vest - with your name and race number.

  • White Facebook Icon
  • White Instagram Icon